1527: ROME HAS BEEN SACKED!

by Heather R. Darsie 6 May 1527. Pope Clement VII had been sitting on St. Peter’s Chair since 19 November 1523.  An illegitimate member of the Medici clan, he was raised by his uncle Lorenzo de’ Medici, known as Lorenzo the Magnificent. His cousin was Pope Leo X, second son of Lorenzo the Magnificent and another Medici. Clement VII was originally trained for military service, … Continue reading 1527: ROME HAS BEEN SACKED!

The Armada is Coming!

by Heather R. Darsie Please note that this post originally appeared on TudorsDynasty.com. It was 29 June 1588. The Spanish Armada sailing in its customary crescent shape was spotted off the coast of Cornwall. After many years of waiting, the time had finally come: Spain was invading England to reclaim the country for Catholicism.  It is possible that Philip II, former brother-in-law to Elizabeth I previous … Continue reading The Armada is Coming!

The End of Kett’s Rebellion

by Heather R. Darsie July, 1549. The almost twelve-years-old Edward VI had been King of England for two-and-a-half years. Landlords had begun enclosing the common lands, which prevented peasants from being able to have a place for their animals to graze. Several landlords had taken to raising sheep, as the English wool trade was growing quite prosperous. This, in concert with a host of other … Continue reading The End of Kett’s Rebellion

The Scots Queen Surrenders: An Overview of the Battle of Carberry Hill

by Heather R. Darsie By 15 June 1567, twenty-four-year-old Mary Stuart had been Queen of Scotland for almost her entire life; never knew her father, James V, because he died when she was six days old; was Queen Consort, then Queen, of France for less than seventeen months; had lost her mother in July 1560; was about to celebrate her son and heir’s first birthday … Continue reading The Scots Queen Surrenders: An Overview of the Battle of Carberry Hill

Dance Until You Die: an Introduction to Ergotism during the Renaissance

by Heather R. Darsie In case you missed it on Tudors Dynasty at http://www.tudorsdynasty.com/dance-to-death-an-introduction-to-ergotism-in-the-renaissance-guest-post/ On an otherwise normal July day in Strasbourg, a woman named Mrs. Troffea began slowly dancing in the street. The year was 1518. Over in England, Katharine of Aragon was pregnant with her last child by Henry VIII. In France, Anne Boleyn was at Queen Claude’s court. And over in Germany, Anna … Continue reading Dance Until You Die: an Introduction to Ergotism during the Renaissance

About Lady Day

by Heather R. Darsie In case you missed it on Tudors Dynasty at  http://www.tudorsdynasty.com/about-lady-day-and-other-major-days-guest-post/ The Christian Feast of the Annunciation takes place on 25 March of every year. It celebrates the day when the Virgin Mary learned that she had immaculately conceived Jesus. Beginning in 1155, 25 March was celebrated as the start of the new year in England. To the Tudors, the holiday was … Continue reading About Lady Day

Sorrow in the City: Reactions to the End of an Age

by Heather R. Darsie, J. D.  On 24 March 1603, Elizabeth I died. She was approaching the age of 70 years. “It is not my desire to live or to reign longer than my life and my reign shall be for your good,” said Elizabeth to her parliament in 1601. Upon one of the many times parliament questioned Elizabeth about her plan of succession, she … Continue reading Sorrow in the City: Reactions to the End of an Age

A Blood-Soaked Christmas

by Heather R. Darsie Christmas Eve, 1601. The setting, a sleepy, south-eastern port town in Ireland. The Nine Years War of Ireland had been raging since 1594, with the English fighting to have control of Ireland under Elizabeth I of England. The unorganized Irish had won several battles and skirmishes against the English, frequently through the use of ambush. But in 1601, trained Spanish troops … Continue reading A Blood-Soaked Christmas

The Beginning of a Dynasty: the Coronation of Henry VII

by Heather R. Darsie On 30 October 1485, Henry VII’s coronation was held, and he became the first Tudor monarch. The date of 30 October was chosen in part because he wished to be crowned king before the next sitting of Parliament, which took place on 7 November. By having his coronation before the next sitting of Parliament, which was the first to take place … Continue reading The Beginning of a Dynasty: the Coronation of Henry VII