Dance Until You Die: an Introduction to Ergotism during the Renaissance

by Heather R. Darsie In case you missed it on Tudors Dynasty at http://www.tudorsdynasty.com/dance-to-death-an-introduction-to-ergotism-in-the-renaissance-guest-post/ On an otherwise normal July day in Strasbourg, a woman named Mrs. Troffea began slowly dancing in the street. The year was 1518. Over in England, Katharine of Aragon was pregnant with her last child by Henry VIII. In France, Anne Boleyn was at Queen Claude’s court. And over in Germany, Anna … Continue reading Dance Until You Die: an Introduction to Ergotism during the Renaissance

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About Lady Day

by Heather R. Darsie In case you missed it on Tudors Dynasty at  http://www.tudorsdynasty.com/about-lady-day-and-other-major-days-guest-post/ The Christian Feast of the Annunciation takes place on 25 March of every year. It celebrates the day when the Virgin Mary learned that she had immaculately conceived Jesus. Beginning in 1155, 25 March was celebrated as the start of the new year in England. To the Tudors, the holiday was … Continue reading About Lady Day

Sorrow in the City: Reactions to the End of an Age

by Heather R. Darsie “It is not my desire to live or to reign longer than my life and my reign shall be for your good,” said Elizabeth to her parliament in 1601. Upon one of the many times parliament questioned Elizabeth about her plan of succession, she stated, “I know I am but mortal and so therewhilst prepare myself for death, whensoever it shall … Continue reading Sorrow in the City: Reactions to the End of an Age

Coronation of Mary of Guise

by Heather R. Darsie Mary of Guise was born 22 November 1515 to Claude of Lorraine, the Duke of Guise, and Antoinette of Bourbon. She was the eldest of twelve children. Mary was first made a wife in 1534 at the age of eighteen when she married the Duke of Longueville. She had two sons with her first husband, the second of whom died young. … Continue reading Coronation of Mary of Guise

A Blood-Soaked Christmas

by Heather R. Darsie Christmas Eve, 1601. The setting, a sleepy, south-eastern port town in Ireland. The Nine Years War of Ireland had been raging since 1594, with the English fighting to have control of Ireland under Elizabeth I of England. The unorganized Irish had won several battles and skirmishes against the English, frequently through the use of ambush. But in 1601, trained Spanish troops … Continue reading A Blood-Soaked Christmas

The Beginning of a Dynasty: the Coronation of Henry VII

by Heather R. Darsie On 30 October 1485, Henry VII’s coronation was held, and he became the first Tudor monarch. The date of 30 October was chosen in part because he wished to be crowned king before the next sitting of Parliament, which took place on 7 November. By having his coronation before the next sitting of Parliament, which was the first to take place … Continue reading The Beginning of a Dynasty: the Coronation of Henry VII

Margaret Tudor: Scottish Queen or English Princess?

by Heather R. Darsie Please enjoy this article I wrote, which originally appeared at: http://queenanneboleyn.com/2017/10/18/margaret-tudor-scottish-queen-english-princess-heather-r-darsie/   Margaret Tudor shuffled off her mortal coil on 18 October 1541, just shy of 52. Though her official cause of death is unknown, it is most likely that Margaret from complications due to a stroke.  A letter dated on or about 31 October 1541 was written by Henry Ray to … Continue reading Margaret Tudor: Scottish Queen or English Princess?

Anne Boleyn and the Famine

by Heather R. Darsie In the Tudor time period, life was very much governed by the church, and people in England generally, at least outwardly, were a religious and God-fearing. Witchcraft was thought to exist, and God could express his pleasure or displeasure, or otherwise send signs through any number of mediums. Did God try to warn Henry VIII, or even Anne Boleyn, that their … Continue reading Anne Boleyn and the Famine

A Brief Overview of the Battle of Lepanto

In 1571, the Ottoman Turks were a proven naval force. Leading up to 1571, the Venetians had attempted to make peace with the Turks to end their expansion through the Mediterranean. Turkish ships would harry the Venetians and, through Barbary pirates, occasionally raid the coasts of France, Spain and Italy. Counter to that, the Christian Knights of St John of Jerusalem effectively behaved as pirates … Continue reading A Brief Overview of the Battle of Lepanto

950th Anniversary of the Battle of Hastings

A battle that shaped our world. Part of scene 52 of the Bayeux Tapestry. Depicts mounted Normans attacking the Anglo-Saxon infantry, 12th century. The King Edward II – King of England. Known as the Confessor. Died childless; cousin of William the Bastard. In 1051 Edward promised William that William would inherit the throne upon Edward’s death. Edward, when close to death in early 1066, told … Continue reading 950th Anniversary of the Battle of Hastings